Campus Nightmares - Netflix

Undergrads and faculty with murder in their hearts, will do anything to preserve their dark secrets. "Campus Nightmares" brings us first-hand accounts of the perpetrators behind America's most shocking campus murders.

Campus Nightmares - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: To Be Determined

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2014-07-30

Campus Nightmares - Me Too movement - Netflix

The Me Too movement (or “#MeToo”, with local alternatives in other languages) is an international movement against sexual harassment and assault. #MeToo spread virally in October 2017 as a hashtag used on social media to help demonstrate the widespread prevalence of sexual assault and harassment, especially in the workplace. It followed soon after the public revelations of sexual misconduct allegations against Harvey Weinstein. Tarana Burke, a social activist and community organizer, began using the phrase “Me Too” in 2006, and the phrase was popularized by Alyssa Milano in 2017 when she encouraged women to tweet about it and “give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem”. The response on Twitter included high-profile posts from several celebrities including Gwyneth Paltrow, Ashley Judd, Jennifer Lawrence, and Uma Thurman.

Campus Nightmares - Overcorrection - Netflix

Richard Ackland, a lawyer and award-winning journalist, described the response to defamation cases “an asphyxiating vortex of litigation”. There has been discussion on whether harsh consequences are warranted for particular examples of alleged misconduct. An especially divisive story broke on Babe.net on January 13, 2018 when an anonymous accuser detailed the events of her date with Aziz Ansari and referred to what transpired as “sexual assault”. Jill Filipovic wrote for The Guardian that “it was only a matter of time before a publication did us the disservice of publishing a sensational story of a badly behaved man who was nonetheless not a sexual assailant”. Some actors have admonished proponents of the movement for not distinguishing between different degrees of sexual misconduct. Matt Damon commented on the phenomenon in an interview, and later apologized, saying “the clearer signal to men and to younger people is, deny it. Because if you take responsibility for what you did, your life's going to get ruined.” Subsequently, Liam Neeson opined that some accused men, including Garrison Keillor and Dustin Hoffman, were being treated unfairly. Tarana Burke said in January 2018, “Those of us who do this work know that backlash is inevitable.” While describing the backlash as carrying an underlying sentiment of fairness, she defended her movement as “not a witch hunt as people try to paint it”. She stated that engaging with the cultural critique in #MeToo was more productive than calling for it to end or focusing on accused men who “haven't actually touched anybody”. Ronan Farrow, who published the Weinstein exposé in the New Yorker that helped start the #MeToo resurgence (alongside New York Times reporters Megan Twohey and Jodi Kantor), was asked in late December 2017 whether he thought the movement had “gone too far”. Farrow called for a careful examination of each story to guard against false accusations but also recalled the alleged sexual abuse his sister Dylan Farrow claims she went through at the hands of his father Woody Allen. He stated that after decades of silence, “My feeling is that this is a net benefit to society and that all of the people, men, and women, pouring forward and saying 'me too' deserve this moment. I think you're right to say that we all have to be conscious of the risk of the pendulum swinging too far, but in general this is a very positive step.” Ijeoma Oluo spoke about how some Democrats have expressed regret over the resignation of Senator Al Franken due to allegations of sexual misconduct. She sympathized with them but stressed the importance of punishing misconduct regardless of whether the perpetrator is viewed as “a bad guy” overall. She wrote that “most abusers are more like Al Franken than Harvey Weinstein”. The New York Times has called this discussion the “Louis C.K. Conundrum”, referring to the admission by comedian Louis C.K. that he committed sexual misconduct with five women, and the subsequent debate over whether any guilt should be associated with enjoyment of his work. Jennifer Wright of Harper's Bazaar has said that public fears of an overcorrection reflect the difficulty of accepting that “likeable men can abuse women too”. Michael Haneke has said it has led to a “witch hunt”.

Campus Nightmares - References - Netflix